Tag Archive: action-packed


When I was 12 my mom went to teachers college. She had to move to be able to go, which was odd for me to say the least. But it ended up giving me two things that directly relate to this book. Thing 1: experience ‘parenting’ a younger sibling. Thing 2: An awesome anthology of children’s literature. (I would love to be more specific about this book, but I’ve just spent the last 15 min scouring the house for it and I don’t know where it has gone. It was dark green and hardcover and about 2 or 3 inches thick… but where it has gone, I have no idea. This makes me le sad. 😦 )

So thing 1 was… interesting. Needless to say my sister and I have very different memories of that time. I remember having to get her up and fed and dressed and to school (no easy feat, which usually involved threats and tears from both of us)… tearing her away from Sailor Moon at lunch time… and making a lot of pasta. She remembers me being mean, me being mean, me pulling her hair when I would put it up, me being mean some more, and hating spaghetti for a long while after this year was over. I’d love to say that this brought us closer together right away and things were awesome between us once our Mom returned and restored the parental balance. But I would be lying. I was 12. She was 8. There were many more years of both of us being mean (probably more me though), not talking to each other, and tears to come. But fast forward to now? I think we are closer because of it, and also because we have stopped being so mean all the time. Dare I say it? Did we grow up?? *gasp* Who knew this day would come??? lol But this arc that our relationship took… I think it’s a lot like what the two sisters in this week’s book go through. Just with more sharp weapons. πŸ˜‰

Now thing 2. Thing 2 was my favourite book for so long because of one thing. Roald Dahl’s poem about Little Red Riding Hood. Here’s a link to the full text, I highly recommend you read it. NOW. lol

No, seriously. Go now. I’ll wait.

Ok. So this poem totally tickled my fancy. I used it for auditions for school plays, recited it to strangers for funzies, and even used it in my Children’s Materials class last year at library school. I ❀ THIS POEM FOREVER. Understand? πŸ˜‰ It’s totally twisted and different, and spins off from the original fairy tale that we are all familiar with in a delicious way. (Now that I think about it, it’s just as awesome as Lizzy’s Lion by Dennis Lee. If you can get your hands on that book, do. You won’t regret it.) And this is what I love very much about this week’s book. It is a brilliant reinterpretation of the Grimm Fairy Tale (and you already know how much I like those…) that works in the modern world and maintains all of the fabulous horror that those original tales were meant to incite.

And now, it is my great pleasure to share with you this week’s kick-ass book:

Book cover of Sisters Red by Jackson Pearce

Sisters Red by Jackson Pearce

Summary:

Scarlett and Rosie March live very happily in the forest with their Grandmother. Until one day when a salesman comes to their door. This is no ordinary salesman. In fact there is nothing at all ordinary about him at all. He changes into a wolf, attacks and kills their Grandmother and Scarlett has to fight him to the death to protect herself and Rosie.

Left alone after the death of their neighbour, the woodsman who looked after them after the wolf attack, Scarlett and Rosie spend their time fighting the wolves who prey on young women. Scarlett is obsessed with ridding the world of these wolves, but Rosie wonders if there isn’t more to life than hunting down evil beings. Then Scarlett’s friend, Silas, returns from a trip out west and Rosie becomes sure that there is more to life than hunting. At the same time, they all notice that the wolves have increased in numbers and set out to hatch a plan to bring them all down.

But will their plan work? And will Scarlett let Rosie be more than the skilled hunter she herself has become? Or will they all die fighting the evil wolves?

Review:

Ok, so I just have to get this out of the way. As I was finishing this book I had an epiphany. And while you may not understand this until you read the book (do it!), you might still chuckle or LOL like I did. πŸ™‚

Scarlett could be Batman.

Totally.

Like this:

Or this:

She would seriously just need sufficient start-up capital. Oh and an Alfred.

But then she would be Batman.

Ok, so aside from the Scarlett/Batman realization, what did I think of this book? Well I loved the heck right out of it. This sucker’s got something for everybody. Action, romance, mystery, intrigue, blood, guts, gore… and it’s really well written. Jackson Pearce has certainly moved on to my short-list for ‘Fav YA Author Discovered This Year’. Otherwise known as my FYAADTY list. πŸ˜‰

Her characters are well fleshed out and definitely believeable. Like I mentioned in my preamble, I really related to Scarlett and Rosie. It’s not easy having a sibling, especially when you feel that you aren’t as good as they are or you feel that you are indebted to them.Β  Sibling relationships are complex, and the fact that Jackson Pearce can write a book from both perspectives and show them to be of equal merit and depth highlights her skill as a writer.

But it isn’t just her characters that shine in this book. Jackson Pearce put together one hell of an action-packed plot! This book was a total page turner, that sucked me in and only very reluctantly let go. You know you’ve got a good book on your hands when hours pass and you don’t even notice! The fight scenes in the book were very awesome too. I love the idea of two kick-butt girls taking on deadly wolves with only their training and blades to keep them safe. And I also really liked the fact that both Scarlett and Rosie didn’t leave the battles unscathed. There is nothing more insulting than a book or movie that tries to sell the idea that you can come out of a fight without a mark on you. I can barely walk around my house without slamming into something, let alone fight someone to the death (which I’ve never even come close to doing btw… but I’m using my imagination here!) and come through it all unscathed. I remember a pillow fight ending in a bloody nose, and a judo battle that ended up with me at the orthodontist and my sparring partner with shredded knuckles. Neither of my combatants in these two cases were demon wolves btw. πŸ˜‰

And the last reason I loved this book is because of Silas. Dear, sweet, wonderful Silas. Silas, who knew enough to let the girls fight and not try to be macho and steal their power. I loved him for that, and for loving Scarlett and Rosie for who they were. Not going to lie, but if my boyfriend weren’t so awesome… I’d totally go and see if Jackson Pearce modeled him on a real guy. See if I could get his digits. πŸ˜‰ lol

Rating: 5 of 5 star rating

I flipping loved this book. Devoured it hole. And now I am very impatiently waiting for Jackson Pearce’s next book to come in. Fingers crossed that it comes soon. πŸ˜€ There is always time in my life to curl up with an awesome fairy tale!

How to get this book:

  1. book
  2. e-audiobook

I would just like to point out that Jackson Pearce has a YouTube channel. She’s also a pretty awesome puppeteer apparently. I think I’m in love. πŸ˜€

I don’t like horror movies. I don’t like gory scenes, or things jumping out at you from dark corners, or knowing that something really really bad is going to happen just from what music is playing during a particular scene. I’ve seen some horror movies (generally not by choice :S), and forced myself to watch some of the classics just so I would get the pop-culture references. Psycho by Alfred Hitchcock was one. And even though it is in black and white and I knew the basic plot, it was still more than scary enough for me. Generally speaking, I keep my movie watching limited to comedies, dramas, or other movies that I figure won’t cause me to jump and scream or have to hide my face.

Unless of course, it’s a Harry Potter movie.

Then I just squint my eyes and flinch and pray that the scary scene doesn’t last too long. Mostly because I forget to breathe during them… and well I’d hate to pay over $9 for a movie and then pass out for part of it. πŸ˜‰

So it is rather strange to me that some of my favourite movies feature the horror movie staple, Zombies.

Exhibit A:

Shaun of the Dead. Seriously, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost… they can do no wrong!

And Exhibit B:

Zombieland.

But I’m getting slightly ahead of myself this week. So I’ll let you read about this week’s book, and then I’ll explain why I’ve been rambling about horror movies, and zombies. πŸ™‚

Here you go:

book cover of "Enclave" by Ann Aguirre

Enclave by Ann Aguirre

Summary:

“I was born during the second holocaust. People had told us legends of a time when human beings lived longer. I thought they were just stories. Nobody even lived to see forty in my world.”

Duce lives underground, in a small community of other holocaust survivors. Everyone here has a specific purpose and is expected to do their job to support the community. Well everyone over the age of 15 that is. If you’re under 15, you don’t even rate a name. But that’s because most ‘brats’ don’t live very long in the enclave… so why bother to give them a name?

Duce has finally reached her 15th birthday and along with her name has also been given a job as a hunter. Being a hunter is the dream she has had for as long as she can remember. But she is partnered with the only hunter who has ever survived life outside the enclave, and she doesn’t trust him at all. Something that could be fatal, given how dangerous the Freaks (fleshing-eating monsters that eat anything that moves in the tunnels) make hunting in the tunnels around the enclave. But Duce quickly comes to realize that her new partner may be the only one she can trust with her life, both in and outside their home.

Reivew:

So everyone and their dog seems to be jumping on the dystopian bandwagon. I’ve already reviewed three such titles, as I’m sure you remember. (Find them here, here & here if you need a refresher!) So when I pulled this book off the new book shelf and saw that it was ‘for fans of The Hunger Games’, I may have rolled my eyes. But, I liked the book cover, and decided to give it a try. And you know what, I’m glad I did.

It took me a little while to get fully into the book. I liked Duce, but our relationship started out slowly since we don’t have much in common. I have never lived underground, although I have lived in basement apartments for many years… and that is almost the same thing. πŸ˜‰ Nor have I ever lived in a postapocalyptic world where one is limited to 3 job descriptions and only lives for a max of 40 years. Clearly my life experience hasn’t been very exciting. πŸ™‚ But, slowly and surely, Duce grew on me.Β  She’s a fiesty character, and is very interesting to watch as she trys to make sense of the new world rapidly unfolding around her. It wasn’t until things really started falling apart for Duce and her fellow hunter Fade, though, that I really started to sit up and pay attention. Unfortunately, as far as I was concerned, the book ended just as things really started to get good. Thank goodness it’s a series!!

So like I’ve indicated with my tags, this book is pretty action packed. It moves along quite quickly, especially in the latter half of the book, and there isn’t an epic amount of time spent on describing the local flora and fauna (yes J.R.R. Tolkien I’m talking to you!). So if you’re a fan of the action, this is another good pick for you.

And finally… like you didn’t see this coming right???… the Freaks that I mention in the summary? They’re so much like Zombies it’s unreal. Flesh-eating, blood-lusting, ravenous Zombies. (Amazeballs!) I’m sorry, I know this is a bit of a spoiler, but seriously dudes it is such a selling point for the book, I had to mention it! I would not have rolled my eyes if the tag-line on the front of the book had said ‘for fans of The Hunger Games and Zombies’! I would have been all over this book so fast it’s head would have spun. Well had it had one that is. *Ahem* Anyhoo… so if you happen to like Zombies, I suggest that you pick this sucker up. And from how Ms. Aguirre leaves things at the end of this book, I feel confident in saying that you’re going to want to pick up the second book when it comes out in 2012 (beware the spoilers through the link!).

Rating: 4 of 5 star rating

Enclave, you get 4 out of 5, and most of that is because of the Zombies. Not going to lie.

However, had I not already made up my mind to give it this rating, I might have made it 5 out of 5 after watching this rather impressive book trailer. This takes the Gone trailer and just blows it right out of the water! WIN. πŸ™‚

Just FYI, I don’t remember the book being quite so charged with sexual tension… I think they’ve Hollywooded the trailer up a tad. Figures. But still awesomesauce right?? And who else thinks that the dude they have playing Fade looks a wee bit like Heath Ledger???

How to get this book:

  1. book
  2. e-audiobook

Also, if you’re into Zombies and would like to see how they mesh with a work of classic literature, I suggest you pick up Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Oh book mash-ups, you make me so happy! *tear*

Finally, and this is not my find… all credit must go to my Zombie Apocalypse-Prepared boyfriend, there is this brilliant house. You may want to pick one up for the family … just in case. What a totally brilliant use of form and function. Frank Lloyd Wright would be proud. (Or not. I don’t know. I just know he was an architect. Sue me. :D)

I have to admit, I am slightly suspicious of writing juggernauts like James Patterson, Nora Roberts or Danielle Steel. Mostly because you have to wonder about someone who can push out that many books in a year (did they make a deal with a demon or something??). I mean, how do they find the time?!? Don’t get me wrong, I have read books by all of them, and enjoyed them very much. But I do get suspicious.

Another thing that makes me suspicious is when authors who have written a zillion and five adult titles* suddenly jump on the YA bandwagon. Yes YA is SO HOT right now. (Just like Hansel.) Yes, when something is SO HOT it is rather lucrative. And it has the ability to bring you, and your astounding back-catalogue, onto the radar of a new generation of readers. But should you be allowed to cash in on this trend if you’re not truly devoted to writing YA??? But this is just my cynical take on things… please make your own opinions! There is absolutely no reason you can’t read one of Mr Patterson’s non-YA novels after all. πŸ™‚

*According to Wikipedia (the most authoritative source ever obvs) Mr Patterson has written 71 books in 33 years. That’s an average of 2.1515151515151 etc. books per year. Doesn’t seem like much… but I think he’s become faster as he’s aged or something.

So, given how suspicious I clearly was about this week’s book… I found I was actually pleasantly surprised. And so, I present to you book number 3,654,842,108 in Mr Patterson’s career:

book cover of "Witch and Wizard" by James Patterson

Witch & Wizard by James Patterson

Summary:

Whit and Wisty Allgood are living normal suburban lives in a world that has started to become a little bit topsy-turvy. There is a new government in charge and it isn’t unusual anymore for armed soldiers to march down a street at 2am and take people from their homes at gun point. Or it is not unusual if you’re Whit and Wisty anyway.

If being taken into custody by the new government isn’t strange enough, try adding the mysterious disappearance of Whit’s girlfriend, Celia, 3 months ago! Nothing is going the way it should be for Whit and Wisty, and it is becoming clear that things are going to get much worse before they ever get better.

Review:

Like I said in my intro, this book actually surprised me. I was expecting … you know, I’m not entirely sure what I was expecting. I’ve read some of James Patterson’s adult novels and remember enjoying them, but that was a long time ago and I’ve read so many books since then I don’t really trust my memory. But for some reason I think I was expecting drivel. (Sorry Mr Patterson!)Why, you ask? Well mostly because I’m judgmental about authors who churn books out more often than most of us change socks, and about authors who jump on the newest trends (in this case YA lit and supernatural stories) so they can make even more money.

Man, I’m rather cynical aren’t I? πŸ˜‰ But I think my cynicism comes from a good place. If you haven’t figured it out already, I love YA lit. I believe that it should be high quality and should never be produced just to make a buck. All readers of YA deserve this, but especially you readers who are yourselves young adults. This is your genre after all!! You have a right to demand quality and I assert my right to demand quality for you. πŸ™‚

But I’m getting off track aren’t I? So what I liked about this book is that it was a fast-paced and interesting story with likeable and believable characters. The pacing was great; if you like a book that moves and doesn’t stop for anything, this is a book for you!

I liked that the story was set in a world that clearly had magical people living with muggles (thanks J.K. for giving us that word!) prior to the new regime coming into power. But since new regimes always want to change the world to their particular vision, clearly these magical folks would need to go. What I did find rather frustrating about this book though, was the fact that it did a lot of assuming. (And you know what happens when you assume. You make an ass out of u and me. It’s an oldy, but a goodie. :D) It assumed that you knew what the world was like before the new regime. That you knew about words or sayings when there had been no prior explanation in the book, or even in a footnote or glossary in the back. Rather frustrating, wouldn’t you agree?

My only other criticism was the lack of character development. Whit and Wisty seem like rather cool people (who am I kidding, I’d love to know a witch and wizard!!!) but we don’t get too much detail about who they are as people and what makes them tick. But like I said, this is a fast-paced, action-packed, thrill-ride of a book. So character development clearly wasn’t priority number 1. Which is fine, since it’s totally just my bias and personal preferences acting up again. πŸ˜‰

Rating: 3 of 5 star rating

This book did not light me on fire. But nor did it completely offend my delicate sensibilities. Ergo, ipso facto columbo oreo, I give this book a fair-to-middling rating. I’m not going to rush out to read the sequel, but nor will I avoid it. πŸ™‚ You dodged a bullet Mr Patterson… carry on. πŸ˜‰

How to get this book:

  1. book
  2. e-audiobook
  3. e-book

As with many YA books right now, and most of the books I choose to read myself, this book is part of a series. SHOCKING RIGHT? lol You currently have access to book number 2 (The Gift) through OverDrive as a downloadable e-audiobook. Book 3 (The Fire) comes out in December 2011. And if that’s not enough of Whit and Whisty for you, there is also a graphic novel (Battle for Shadowland).

I also found this book trailer for The Gift… and it makes mention of a movie?!? But I couldn’t find anything else on the interwebz to confirm or deny this. Your guess is as good as mine!!

Have you ever noticed how there is very often a character in a book/movie/tv show that is in love with the main character… even though the main character only considers them a friend? One of my favourite examples of this is from a classic John Hughes movie: Pretty In Pink. There are probably a million more, but I think that everyone should know about Andie and Duckie.

Now whenever there is a relationship like this in a book I’m reading/movie or tv show I’m watching, my reaction is almost always to take the side of the friend and root for them. What can I say, I like the underdog. But what invariably ends up happening is heartbreak. For the friend and for me. :S And Pretty in Pink is no exception.

What happens after the heartbreak varies. Sometimes this ends the relationship and, if there is a dark side to join, the friend often throws their lot in with the baddies… providing valuable insider information about the main character’s weaknesses. Othertimes, like in Pretty In Pink, there is no dark side. But that shouldn’t be shocking… the movie is called Pretty In Pink, not Star Wars. πŸ˜‰ So the friend is left to decide whether or not they want to resume their friendship status and give up hope that the main character will love them eventually if they just try hard enough. I’m not going to tell you what happens in Pretty In Pink in the end… you’ll just have to find a copy and find out for yourselves. It’s worth it. If only for the amazingly insane 80’s fashion. πŸ™‚

Needless to say this is a secondary plotline in this week’s book. And I’m sure you’re wondering just what that book is, and why I have done such a huge lead-up. Well I do have a point. And I will get there… when I’m good and ready. πŸ˜‰

But for now, I would like to introduce you to the book of the week:

book cover of "City of Bones" by Cassandra Clare

City of Bones by Cassandra Clare

Summary:

Out at an all ages club one night, Clary Fray witnesses something that changes her life forever. Clary impulsively follows a boy into a storage closet in the club in order to warn him that he was being followed, and instead watches him die. But if that wasn’t awful enough, the 3 kids who kill this boy aren’t quite human. They insist that the boy they killed wasn’t either. But is Clary supposed to believe that he was actually a demon?? From this point on Clary realizes that she can’t take anything she thought she knew to be true seriously or trust anyone she thought was on her side. Because nothing is true anymore and it seems like no one is on her side.

Review:

Because I want to be honest here, I’m going to have to say that my opinion of this book is counter to what most people have said they think/feel about it. It is a New York Times bestseller (the whole series is actually), and has been singled out by many YA organizations and bloggers as an excellent book… but I really didn’t like it. :S I found the plot slow and really unbelieveable. I know it’s fantasy, and I’m usually really good at suspending my disbelief … but this was just frustrating.

Even more frustrating was how little I liked the main character. Objectively I have no issues with Clary, but something about how she was written just didn’t click with me. Less than 1/4 of the way into the book she had completely lost me. I wasn’t invested in her story one bit. And, although it took me forever to figure out why, I have pinpointed my issue. Much like my love for Duckie’s character in Pretty in Pink inspired my ire towards Andie, my instant support of Clary’s best friend Simon completely destroyed any chance I had of connecting with her. And unlike in Shiver, Simon does not feature heavily in the novel… leaving me with little to enjoy. Also, I found Clary’s love interest (Jace) to be vapid and rude.

The thing that really irks me about how little I liked this book is that I really liked the idea! The thought that there is a world outside our own, that there are beings who are not human living among us… I find that all very fascinating and usually enjoy reading books with similar plots. So it was really lunchbag letdown reading this book. I was stoked that I had found another series to read… but it turns out I got excited too soon. 😦

Rating: 2 of 5 star rating

Like I said, this book didn’t do it for me. I really don’t like when I don’t like a book… but it is bound to happen right?? Please, if you found the other books in the series to be better, let me know. I might be convinced to give Clary and company another chance.

How to get this book:

  1. book

We also have books 2 & 3 in the series: City of Ashes and City of Glass.

They are also up on OverDrive in e-audiobook format. If you’re being forced to take a long road trip with the family this summer and get sick reading in the car, this could be the format for you! Just load up your mp3 player, and you’ve got hours of distraction at your fingertips. πŸ˜‰

Most people have heard of the book Lord of the Flies by William Golding. Even if you weren’t made to read it in high school, or in a college or university English class; most people are also familiar with the basic plot of the novel. (If you aren’t, this can help you out. If it sounds like something you’d like to read, we’ve got the book, (in two places), a playaway copy, the movie, and access to an e-book and an e-audiobook. Don’t everyone rush out and read/listen to/watch it all at once. We might not have enough copies. πŸ˜‰ lol)

The point of my mentioning Lord of the Flies?

Right, I did have one! And it was… that there are many similarities between that book and the book that I reviewed for this week’s blog post. But don’t hold that against this week’s book. As many of the recent trend of book mashups have proven, adding a twist on a classic can take it to a whole new and completely awesome level. So without any further ado, please give a warm YABooks@BPL welcome to

*pause for effect*

book cover of "Gone" by Michael Grant

Gone by Michael Grant

Summary:

Sam Temple never expected his life to change as drastically as it did a few weeks before his 14th birthday. He’d been sitting in math class with his best friend Quinn when the teacher, and some of his classmates just disappeared. Poof. Gone. And not just from his class, but from the whole school. Every adult and some of the kids, gone. But where?

As kids started to act like it was a holiday from reality, raiding vending machines and generally running amuck; Sam, Quinn and a girl from their grade named Astrid began to wonder what was really going on. Finding no working phones, tv or internet they set off to find out what else had changed in that split second. And nothing could prepare them for what was to come.

Review:

It is my opinion that Michael Grant has done his homework. He has watched teenagers in the wild, and he knows how they react in their natural habitat… minus adults/authority figures. Overwhelmingly, they’re good people. They may not pick up after themselves and they may sleep until noon and be up until all hours… but really, without pesky responsibilities and all of the parts of our society that run from 9-5 requiring you to stick to a schedule, who wouldn’t sleep in and stay up late?!?!? (Plus it’s a documented fact that teenagers need more sleep, and need it during different hours of the day than other people. There’s even a documentary about why! So there. πŸ˜‰ ) This is why I love this book. Michael Grant seems to get it. And boy does he ever do a good job at fleshing his characters out in to believable, 3 dimensional people!

But don’t take my word for it. Read the book! (And then tell me what you think please and thank you.)

Oh and another reason I love this book? The pacing. It’s good. Page-turner good. πŸ™‚ With enough action, introspection, romance, and moments that make you go “What the…?!?!?!” to please anyone. So have at ‘er!

My only question about this whole book… could someone who is learning how to drive read this and let me know if it really is as stressful and complicated as it is portrayed in the book? I’ve been driving for too many years now to remember that part. I do, however, remember how awesome it was to drive alone for the first time!

Rating: four out of five star rating

I give this book a solid 4 stars.

Now I know what you’re thinking. Do I ever not like a book???? Because I seem to be very giving with my star ratings. And what I have to say to that is this:

a) I’ll give as many stars as I want, thank you very much!

b) It takes a lot for me to not like a book. Although in high school I remember having to read several books that made me want to step into traffic Γ  la Regina George. Thankfully that part of our lives is short-lived. πŸ˜‰

and c) You’d give this book 4 stars too. And you know you would. πŸ™‚ So don’t hate.

How to get this book:

  1. book

FYI: As I mentioned, this is yet another book that is part of a series. And guess what? We’ve got all of them. WIN. After Gone, you’ll want to look for Hunger, Lies and Plague. Aren’t series’ the greatest???

Also, Harper Collins (the publisher) has a book trailer up for Gone. Lamesauce is my comment… but you let me know what you think.

Finally, this is what Michael Grant had to say about Gone.

“Anyway, Gone. My goal in writing theΒ Gone series? To creep you out. To make you stay up all night reading, then roll into school tired the next day, so that you totally blow the big test and end up dropping out of school.” TrΓ¨s funny, Mr. Grant. (from publisher’s page)

In case you have been out of touch with the world since 2009, this review will feature this little book here.

book cover of "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins

Maybe you’ve heard of it??? If not, don’t worry, I’m going to tell you all about it! (With as few spoilers as possible. Promise.)

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Summary:

Katniss Everdeen is 16 and lives with her mother and younger sister in Panem’s District 12, aka the Seam. (Panem was founded in the ruins of what we call North America and is divided into 12 districts and one capitol territory.) They live in poverty, surviving on what Katniss and her friend Gale bring home from their dangerous and illegal hunting trips in the forest outside the Seam.

The morning we meet Katniss is a holiday of sorts in Panem. Called the reaping, it begins the Games; a huge televised event held every year in Panem pitting two children from each district against each other in a fight to the death. The winner of the Games each year is given fabulous riches and lives in luxury for the rest of their lives. Unfortunately, to manage this they have to survive the unimaginable horrors of the Games.

At this year’s reaping Katniss’s sister, Prim, is the first person, or tribute, picked in District 12 to compete in the Games. Not willing to let her sister die in the Games, Katniss volunteers herself and begins the terrifying journey to the Capitol where the Games are held each year.

Review:

I LOVED this book. It moves so quickly, the story just pulls you from chapter to chapter. *Be warned, this might not be a good book to start before bed. You won’t want to sleep!* Katniss is a really well written character; and, while I certainly didn’t agree with all of her decisions as the story went forward, I understood her well enough to at least get why she makes the choices she does. I really felt that Katniss was a real person, she is so well described. I connected with her quickly and felt the whole range of emotions (terror to happiness) with her as she competes in the games.

Suzanne Collins does a really great job of helping the reader to see the world of Panem and the games clearly. Her characters are equally vivid, and she builds so much suspense in the story with her strong clear writing. Thankfully this is the first book in a series, so you don’t have to worry about saying goodbye to Katniss and Panem when this book ends. Also, you know that Suzanne will make the next books just as suspenseful and fun to read as the Hunger Games!

Rating:

four of five star rating

I give this book 4 stars. It kicked-butt and took names Γ  la Chuck Norris.

How to get this book:

Because I know you are now totally excited to read this book, I will share with you the 2 ways that you can get your paws on it from our library. And remember, you’ll need your library card for both!

  1. book (This link is currently broken… we had to get a new copy of the book, but it will be on the shelf and the link fixed soon I promise!)
  2. e-audiobook

Once you’ve read it, let me know what you thought!! Oh and btw, you are allowed to disagree with me. πŸ™‚

Want the next two books? Find Catching Fire and Mocking Jay at the library too.

P.S. This book is being made into a movie. I can’t decide if that’s a good idea or not… We’ll see!

Hot off the interwebs: Check out this killer glog (it’s like a blog smashed with a poster smashed with YouTube) for books that you may like if you liked The Hunger Games. I take no credit, some other awesome librarian did this sucker! πŸ˜€